Two “Disappearing” Pakistani Teenage Girls Ran Away From Home to Meet BTSKpop fans are always willing to go to great lengths to see their favorite artists, but sometimes it can go too far and be dangerous. Two teenage girls who went missing in Pakistan last week were found more than 1,200 km from their home after trying to travel to South Korea to meet with the K-pop supergroup BTS, the country’s police said. Two girls aged 13 and 14 disappeared from Koranga in Karachi city on Saturday, said Abraiz Ali Abbasi, a senior police commissioner in the area. According to the father of 13-year-old Mohammed Junaid, an older friend of his daughter came to visit. When he returned home from a trip, his family told him that the girls were not at home; when he looked for them, he did not find them anywhere. During a search of their home, police found a newspaper that reported their intention to travel to South Korea to meet with the BTS supergroup, Abbasi said in a video message. “We saw mentions in the newspaper about the train schedule and that they were planning to run away with another friend… whom we then interviewed,” Abassi said. “We started aggressively pursuing them and found that they were detained by the police in the city of Lahore, where they were traveling by train. » They were found already in the police and in a “pitiful state” after the trip. “The girls were hiding to go unnoticed or to remain unnoticed. According to the officer who found them, they were disguised and dressed in a certain way [to look like boys]. — Press Secretary of the Railway Police Abbasi said the arrangements for the girls to be taken home to Karachi had been coordinated with the Lahore police. And he urged parents to “watch how their children spend at the screen” so that they know better what their children are watching on the Internet. “It’s not surprising that two teenage girls took such a risk, because “fans” can do it for their idols,” said cultural journalist Rabia Mehmood. “But if we had safer organized places for female fans, young fans could openly and freely discuss their favorites with each other, instead of taking such a risk.” K-pop has a huge number of fans all over the world, including in Pakistan, among fans of all age groups and genders. BTS posters and albums are being sold all over South Asia, and Korean dramas are also gaining popularity. We are assured that they were found healthy.

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Kpop fans are always willing to go to great lengths to see their favorite artists, but sometimes it can go too far and be dangerous.

Two teenage girls who went missing in Pakistan last week were found more than 1,200 km from their home after trying to travel to South Korea to meet with the K-pop supergroup BTS, the country’s police said.

Two girls aged 13 and 14 disappeared from Koranga in Karachi city on Saturday, said Abraiz Ali Abbasi, a senior police commissioner in the area.

According to the father of 13-year-old Mohammed Junaid, an older friend of his daughter came to visit. When he returned home from a trip, his family told him that the girls were not at home; when he looked for them, he did not find them anywhere.

During a search of their home, police found a newspaper that reported their intention to travel to South Korea to meet with the BTS supergroup, Abbasi said in a video message.

“We saw mentions in the newspaper about the train schedule and that they were planning to run away with another friend… whom we then interviewed,” Abassi said.

“We started aggressively pursuing them and found that they were detained by the police in the city of Lahore, where they were traveling by train. »

They were found already in the police and in a “pitiful state” after the trip.

“The girls were hiding to go unnoticed or to remain unnoticed. According to the officer who found them, they were disguised and dressed in a certain way [to look like boys]. — Press Secretary of the Railway Police

Abbasi said the arrangements for the girls to be taken home to Karachi had been coordinated with the Lahore police.

And he urged parents to “watch how their children spend at the screen” so that they know better what their children are watching on the Internet.

“It’s not surprising that two teenage girls took such a risk, because “fans” can do it for their idols,” said cultural journalist Rabia Mehmood. “But if we had safer organized places for female fans, young fans could openly and freely discuss their favorites with each other, instead of taking such a risk.”

K-pop has a huge number of fans all over the world, including in Pakistan, among fans of all age groups and genders. BTS posters and albums are being sold all over South Asia, and Korean dramas are also gaining popularity.

We are assured that they were found healthy.

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