TikTok is trying to prove it’s a “made-up phenomenon”

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In the past few days, TikTok and Twitter have been inundated with videos of users wanting to “prove” that snow is not natural. For this, several people are burning snowballs with lighters or matches to affirm their “theories”.

On social media, people insist that snow is fake because it “does not melt and just burns”. So, a user does not recommend placing snowballs in the microwave, as “there is metal mixed with the ice and this will cause sparks”.

Obviously, everyone should know that snow is a meteorological phenomenon caused by low temperatures or a sudden drop in temperature in a region. Thus, the water vapor is frozen and turns into small ice crystals.

Therefore, the secret behind the “burning” snow is sublimation. Ice changes from a solid to a gaseous state when it is struck by a flame. In this case, it turns into steam instead of liquid – as people expect.

On YouTube, you can find several videos that show the process of sublimation:

The “culprits” for the fake snow

The recent theory came to light after Texas was hit by a devastating winter storm. Surprisingly, even areas of the US state that have never seen snow have been hit by the blizzard.

As a result, conspiracy theorists began to share false information about snow being a “manufactured phenomenon”. During the videos, users appoint several people responsible for the “event”.

There are people who believe that this would be more of a “work” by Bill Gates. In addition to the fake snow, the former Microsoft CEO would be blamed for other ills that hit the world – from the covid-19 pandemic to the tracking chips that are in vaccines against the virus.

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There are also theories that claim that the great blizzard is a Chinese conspiracy. The Asian country is said to be sending fake snow to the United States in an effort to convince Americans that climate change is real.

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