The International Space Station lurks “blue jets”

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Astronomers have made fascinating discoveries in recent years. In addition to discovering that the Earth and the Solar System are closer to the black hole in the center of the Milky Way than previously thought, the researchers also found a “spider star” that escapes the classifications already known for presenting unique characteristics.

Despite this, there are still a series of phenomena as interesting as on Earth itself, which deserve attention to better understand the functioning of our planet. This is the case of recent occurrences in the Earth’s atmosphere detected by the International Space Station (ISS) and observed by the European Monitor for Space Atmospheric Interactions (ASIM).

According to astronomers, five blue flashes were seen near the island of Naru, in the Pacific Ocean, lasting about 10 milliseconds each. Four of them emitted small pulses of ultraviolet light, resembling small expanding rings, while the fifth emitted the so-called “Blue Jet” (Blue Jet) into space, a special type of ray capable of reaching up to 50km beyond the stratosphere. You can see an artistic representation of the phenomenon in the following video:

These phenomena are formed from the interaction of electrons with radio waves and the atmosphere, being known as Elves, or Emissions of Light and Very Low Frequency Perturbations due to Electromagnetic Pulse Sources (Light Emissions and Very Low Frequency Disturbances due to Sources Electromagnetic Pulse). According to astronomers, the observation of these occurrences by ASIM can help us to understand the appearance of lightning and how they influence the concentration of greenhouse gases.

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“This article is an impressive highlight of the many new phenomena that ASIM is observing above storms and shows that we still have a lot to discover and learn about our universe,” said Astrid Orr, ESA’s coordinator of physical sciences for human and robotic space flights. , about the discovery, published in the scientific journal Nature.

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