Razer Huntsman Mini, review. Compact as recommended

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We take a look at Razer’s new keyboard, a sleek unit that opts for simplicity and efficiency in use. The Razer keyboard, a curious specimen that since its birth has served the noble mission of being the first way for many to enter the world of switch keyboards, attracting new ones with its showy lights.

In the past this is where their merit and achievement came, being decent keyboards as a first option but unattractive for anyone more exquisite with their tastes. But Razer has listened to that sector that is obsessed with the quality of a keyboard as if it were a miniature galleon and begins to bring us keyboards that mix their traditional technological innovation with a more traditional and self-conscious design. It is in this line that the keyboard that we will analyze in this text comes, the Razer Huntsman Mini.

Mouse space

This new keyboard from Razer comes in the arch-popular 60% format. This means that it lacks some keys that the average user might consider indispensable, the directional arrows being perhaps the most important for the player (many games use them to move through interfaces) but we do not have a row of F, screenshot, etc. Instead these are relegated to a second column of functionality accessible by pressing the function key. The arrows for example would be activated by pressing Fn + J, Fn + K, Fn + L or Fn + I. This can be cumbersome at first but in games that don’t really need these missing keys (see most multiplayer FPS) the small size of the keyboard frees up space for moving the mouse. The more room to move the mouse, the better our chances of being precise and fast simultaneously. We wanted, however, to emphasize this immediate loss of functionality due to the format. Of course, the “Ñ” is conspicuous by its absence.

For the rest, the version of the keyboard that we have received could pass for being made by a good Chinese brand of simple mechanical keyboards, without few modifications but with good quality in all its parts. Our version comes in what they call a “mercury white” and is quite pleasant to the eyes, with a minimalist casing that allows the keys to protrude and with little space between them, revealing the switches. A design that in our opinion is very elegant but that facilitates the accumulation of dust, although it facilitates its cleaning.


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