How To Download And Play Wordle Offline And What Consequences It Has

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Wordle: It is the viral game of the moment. The vast majority play it daily and, if you have social networks, you will surely see how some of your contacts have published their results in Wordle, an online game of guessing a hidden word in six attempts that its creator programmed to entertain himself and his friends , and which has become an absolute trend. And it couldn’t be easier to play and also the thrill of having only 6 attempts to guess it.

Download Wordle and play it offline

An interesting thing about Wordle is that it is a web page, and web pages can be saved. This means that all of the game code, and all of the puzzles, are in your browser when you open it at www.powerlanguage.co.uk/wordle/. And if you go to File > Save Page As (in Chrome, but all browsers offer this functionality), and save it somewhere, you can open that file and continue playing, even offline without being online.

As technologist Aaron Rieke explains in a Twitter thread, all game options like dark theme or hard mode will work in this downloaded version of the game. In fact, you don’t even have to download the page; you can go to a replica of Wordle’s website – like this one on the Internet Archive – and play there.

You can also right-click > save as to create a complete copy of Wordle on your desktop, just like any other web page you might save for offline use. You double-click the icon to launch it in a web browser, and it will load today’s word.

Without saving your progress

It doesn’t keep my previous progress, just like the web version doesn’t keep your streak intact when you go from playing Wordle on a desktop browser to playing Wordle on a phone – but you could theoretically start building a new one if you want, and I wouldn’t mind. I’d be surprised if someone figured out a way to import progress as well. (Several people have suggested to me that you can pull it from your browser using developer tools, since the game uses local storage for that too).

Of course, like all things in this world, playing Wordle offline has a drawback, a ‘but’, a consequence: And that is that your progress will not be saved, just like the web version does not keep your streak intact when you go from playing Wordle in a desktop browser to play Wordle on a phone – but you could theoretically start building a new one if you wanted. And in fact, the Share button is maintained so that you can continue to show on networks that you got the word right on the first – second attempt.

This is good news for sure, as Wordle was recently sold to The New York Times, which keeps most of its content behind a paywall. And while the Times said the game would remain free to start with, if that changes at some point in the future, you’ll always have the original Wordle.