Euphoria: Zendaya’s forceful response to those who criticize the drama

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Euphoria, the teen series that follows a group of high school students who are plunged into a spiral of problems and erratic behavior, premiered its second season on streaming platform HBO Max in early January, after being absent from screens for a long time. His episodes were the center of harsh criticism recently.

The drama is specifically focused on the character Rue Bennett, played by Zendaya since the first season. The young woman battles her own inner demons as she struggles with her drug addiction. In her most recent episode, fans of her saw her developing violent behavior and at the same time she was trying to avoid being taken to rehab again.

The Euphoria series is characterized by its raw stories inspired by the real experiences of the show’s creator Sam Levinson. The HBO Max drama graphically shows extreme situations in which the characters can be seen lost in the excessive world of drugs, alcohol and sex.

Five episodes of Euphoria Season 2 have aired so far, but after the third installment aired, Zendaya’s series came under heavy criticism from representatives of the show on Education for Resisting Abuse. of Drugs, who assure that the HBO Max drama glorifies the consumption of this type of substance and serves as a wrong model for adolescents in real life.

Last week, the educational show D.A.R.E. received a response from creator and showrunner Sam Levinson. Now, it was Zendaya herself who came to Euphoria’s defense while speaking to Entertainment Weekly. The interpreter of Rue, stated that viewers should not follow the example of her character Rue of her, who is constantly abusing substances.

Zendaya spoke to EW about Euphoria’s intense season 2 episode 5, in which her character faced intervention about her addiction. She explained that the events depicted in the series are not meant to glorify substance abuse. On the contrary, the actress believes that the series can serve as a helpful tool for those who face similar problems. She said this:

“Our show is in no way a morality tale to teach people how to live their lives or what they should do. If anything, the feeling behind Euphoria, or what we’ve always tried to do with it, is to help help people feel a little less alone in their experience and their pain. And maybe feel like they’re not the only ones going through or dealing with what they’re dealing with.”