ESPN’s Official Twitter Celebrates Dodgeball’s 18th Anniversary

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ESPN celebrates the victory of Average Joe in a tweet in honor of the eighteenth anniversary of Dodgeball. Directed and written by Rawson Marshall Thurber. In the movie “Bouncers: The Real Loser Story” is about wacky losers from the Average Joe’s gym who compete head-to-head with the giant Globo Gym chain in a bouncer tournament, trying to win money to keep their gym open. The fun begins with a training montage with wrench throwing, inappropriate uniforms being replaced with fetish costumes, and sudden death, a blindfolded bouncer shootout. Such memorable scenes make the film an eternal favorite, and negotiations are even underway to create a TV series “Bouncers”.

Vince Vaughn plays Peter LaFleur, the owner of the Average Joe gym, and Ben Stiller plays antagonist White Goodman, the owner of the Globo Gym. Stiller’s real-life wife Kristin Taylor plays lawyer Kate Veatch, who is liked by both men, but she joins the Average Joe’s bouncer team when Goodman’s creepy courtship becomes too much for her. The rest of the cast of Dodgeball features Rip Thorne as a grumpy coach, Justin Long as a wannabe cheerleader, Stephen Root as a soft father, Alan Tudyk as pirate Steve, Joel David Moore as a clumsy who falls in love with another team player (Fran Stalinovskovich-Daviddivichsky Missy Pyle) and many others, including cameo roles of Lance Armstrong, Chuck Norris and William Shatner.

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Dodgeball is now celebrating the eighteenth anniversary of its release on June 18, 2004, and ESPN expresses its best wishes on this occasion on its Twitter page. They congratulate the Average Joe on coming back from a four-man disadvantage and winning the American Dodgeball Association tournament. See their full post below:

It’s been 18 years since the Globo Gym Purple Cobras lost a four-man advantage against Average Joe’s Gym in the American Bouncer Association of America tournament.

It’s pretty funny that ESPN celebrates the Dodgeball tournament as if it were a real event, a real outsider victory to celebrate. It almost brings the movie to life, as the dodgeball tournament was broadcast on that network’s little-known channel, ESPN 8: The Ocho, with its own bizarre sports like skiing with squirrels, and commentators played by Gary Cole and Jason Bateman. Although the channel was invented for the film, the real ESPN has clearly become its owner, and ESPN 8: The Ocho now exists in one form or another.

This channel and ESPN’s recognition of the bouncer on the day of his anniversary enhance the humor of the film, as they give weight to the tournament. In the film, the tournament is shown as a very serious, fateful game, contrasting with the reality of the usual place of a bouncer in elementary school. Through this and other means, bouncers really make fun of the idea of inspiring sports drama, and ESPN’s involvement only reinforces the satire.