Dark energy may not exist, defends new study

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Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, suggest that there is no reason to consider the possibility of the existence of so-called dark energy, which, according to previous estimates, would account for about 70% of the composition of the Universe, combined with 25% of matter dark and 5% of conventional elements.

Steen Harle Hansen, associate professor at the research center DARK Cosmology Center and leader of the theory, explains that he and his team developed a computational model in which they found that the dark energy, to which the expansion of our world is attributed, is equivalent to dark matter. loaded with a few more properties. Magnetic fields generated by the inserts would make the presence of what was discarded redundant, he adds.

“We don’t know much about dark matter, unless it is a heavy, slow particle. Anyway, we ask ourselves: what if it had some quality analogous to magnetism? We know that, as normal particles move, the magnets attract or repel other magnets. What if this is what is happening in the Universe? What if this constant expansion of dark matter is occurring thanks to some kind of magnetic force? “, exemplifies Hansen.

It is these questions that led them to create a new way of performing calculations, shaking bases that have already been contested at other times.

A pinch of magnetism

Although it is unknown what exactly are the mechanisms responsible for the aforementioned actions, Steen and others added to the algorithms everything that is a fact so far, such as gravity, the expansion speed of the Universe and, of course, the mysterious force that drives it, not yet unveiled, but present in analyzes since Albert Einstein’s definition of the cosmological constant in 1917 – dark matter or energy.

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“We developed a model that assumed that dark matter particles had a type of magnetic force and we investigated what effect that force would have on the Universe. It turns out that it would have exactly the same effect on the speed of expansion as that found in dark energy”, highlights Steen Hansen. “Honestly, our discovery may just be a coincidence. However, if it isn’t, it’s really incredible,” he ponders.

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