A Cave Salamander Has Been Moved From Its Place for Seven Years

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Salamanders are known as one of the longest living creatures. The years of inertia of the cave salamander, which is a rarely observed species among the salamanders, caused surprise among researchers.

Studies about salamanders continue to surprise scientists. Previous studies have shown that these creatures can live for hundreds of years. A new study revealed that the salamander known as a cave salamander could remain motionless for years.

Researchers working on cave salamanders examined the data of ten years of cave salamanders in caves in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The research revealed that cave salamanders moved less than 10 meters in 10 years. One of the salamanders living in the caves of Bosnia and Herzegovina never moved from where it was for 7 years.

Studies on cave salamanders show how durable these creatures are. Cave salamanders can live without feeding for several years. Blind cave salamanders prefer to live underground or underwater.

Cave salamanders move several meters in a few years
Cave salamanders, who move every 12.5 years to mate, usually live in caves with little nutrients. Salamanders feed on small shrimps, snails and insects whenever possible.

Gergely Balázs-led scientists at Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary conducted a study on the cave salamander population in water caves east of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

For more than eight years, the researchers used a method called “catch-mark-recapture” to follow cave salamanders. “They hang around, they hardly move,” Balázs told New Scientist about the study.

Scientists working on cave salamanders published the results of the study in Journal Zoology. In the article they wrote, the researchers stated that the studies on the species were generally carried out in a laboratory environment, and not working in natural areas caused data deficiency.

Researchers from Eötvös Loránd University say the study of the water cave ecosystem is an overlooked area. Studies on water caves as unprotected ecosystems can lead to other things that benefit the water cave ecosystem beyond these ecosystems.

Scientists at Eötvös Loránd University, working on cave salamanders, announced that the study on these creatures will provide other information about the water cave ecosystem.


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