Brazil will suffer ‘consequences’ if it adopts Huawei’s 5G

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To the newspaper O Globo, the United States ambassador, Todd Chapman, said that if Brazil deploys its 5G networks based on an infrastructure provided by Huawei, the country will suffer negative “consequences”. The interview was granted on Wednesday (29).

A matter of “national security”

The US banned Huawei, accusing it of spying – by contributing to the Chinese government, passing on information from American companies – which has not been proven so far and there is no concrete evidence of such collaboration.

Now, Chapman explained that there are no commercial interests in the possible deals between Brazil and Huawei, since American companies are not competing to supply 5G equipment. The issue in this negotiation would be “national security”, and this will hinder future investments by American companies in Brazil.

Sector-specific companies are based on intellectual property, and they are afraid to invest in countries where that intellectual property is under any threat to its integrity.

Examples of companies that deal with intellectual property are those in the pharmaceutical and software sectors. If Brazil acquires 5G equipment from a company that could contribute to the Chinese government, it would run a serious risk of losing investment by companies in these segments, which could cause our country to perpetuate itself as an exporter of raw materials, instead of start exporting high technology.

At the moment, in addition to Huawei, there are three other 5G equipment suppliers: Ericsson (Sweden), Nokia (Finland) and Samsung (South Korea).

Banning Huawei would be next to impossible
For Brazil, banning Huawei, as Americans want, would be a virtually impossible task. The Chinese company has strengthened here over the past 20 years and, today, the National Telecommunications Agency (Anatel) estimates that, of the 86,000 towers of 2G, 3G and 4G networks in our territory, 70,000 were manufactured by Huawei.

See Also
UK to Decide on Banning Huawei

In June, the vice president of the republic, Hamilton Mourão, told UOL that “… our operators cannot, overnight, simply take it away”.


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